9 Impressive Benefits of Ceylon Tea

There are impressive benefits of ceylon tea, including its ability to aid in weight loss, protect against chronic illness, boost heart health, increase energy levels, strengthen the immune system, improve the appearance of the skin, moderate diabetic symptoms, and prevent kidney stones. Ceylon Tea You may not be familiar with the term ceylon tea, possibly because you’ve never heard of Ceylon – the formal name of Sri Lanka until 1972. Tea production in this country is impressive and is responsible for over $1.5 billion of global tea sales. The excellent terrain…

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Ceylon vs. Cassia — Not All Cinnamon Is Created Equal

Cinnamon is a very popular spice. Not only is it delicious, its many health benefits are also impressive. Cinnamon is cheap and widely available in most supermarkets. At least, one type is. Most people don’t realize there are actually two main types of this spice. Both of them are healthy, but one contains a toxin that is harmful if you eat too much of it. This article explains the differences between Ceylon and cassia cinnamon. What Is Cinnamon? Cinnamon is a spice created from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum…

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Tea Traditions from Around The World

Every country in the world loves a good cup of tea, which is probably why they have developed unique styles of enjoying it. Have you ever tried one of these brew-takes on the classic cuppa?   Morocco – served in three rounds, each with a slightly different flavour, the drink is a blend of mint, green tea and lots of sugar. You cannot refuse any of the servings, unless you want to offend your host.   Tibet – would you like some butter and salt with your tea? That’s how Tibet does…

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History of Ceylon Tea

Tea has a rich and fascinating history. For hundreds of years people consumed tea for its medicinal qualities. More and more tea plats were discovered and tea drinking became more popular. All this paved the way to tea becoming one of the most sort after beverages around the globe. Sri Lanka was introduced to tea much later. Until the 1860’s the main crop produced in Sri Lanka was Coffee but in 1869 a fungus destroyed the crop so the estate owners had to diversify into other crops. Firstly a tea…

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How to Differentiate Between Ceylon and Cassia Cinnamon

Cinnamon is one of those herbs which have been used in the traditional treatments and medicines for a wide range of ailments since ancient times. Among many other remedies and combination, cinnamon and honey is one of the most useful, effective and easy to use home remedies for several conditions. You need to pay attention to a very important fact that all cinnamon is no good. Most people do not know it. There is a lot of discussion on the internet on topics like benefits, uses, remedies etc of cinnamon.…

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The Healing Benefits of CINNAMON & HONEY

Folk remedies have been around a long time for a very good reason– they work! Here is another for the folks: CINNAMON & HONEY Honey is the only food on the planet that will not spoil or rot. It will do what some call turning to sugar.  Never boil honey or put it in a microwave. To do so will kill the enzymes in the honey. Make sure your honey is untreated, unprocessed and not heated, in other words get as raw as possible. This will have the greatest benefit.…

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Grades & Regions Of Ceylon Tea

Sri Lanka has over 188,000 hectares under tea cultivation yielding about 298,000 tonnes of “made” tea, and accounting for more than 19% of world exports. In 1972, the island then known as Ceylon reverted to the traditional name of Sri Lanka, but retained the brand name of Ceylon for the marketing of its teas. Tea from Sri Lanka falls into three categories: low-grown (on estates up to an elevation of 2,000ft); medium grown (on elevations between 2,000 and 4,000 ft); and high grown (elevations above 4,000 ft). Each level produces…

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History of Tea production in Sri Lanka

Tea production in Sri Lanka, formerly Ceylon, is of high importance to the Sri Lankan economy and the world market. The country is the world’s fourth largest producer of tea and the industry is one of the country’s main sources of foreign exchange and a significant source of income for laborers, with tea accounting for 2% of GDP, generating roughly $700 million annually. In 1995, Sri Lanka was the world’s leading exporter of tea, (rather than producer) with 23% of the total world export, but it has since been surpassed…

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